SIDELING HILL

GEOLOGY

MARYLAND U.S.A

 

Sideling Hill is a part of the Allegheny Mountain Front of the Appalachian Chain, 

The whole 80 mile long Sideling Hill ridgeline begins in Slanesville West Virginia and ends just north of Breezewood in Pennsylvania within the Broad Top Coal Basin.  

 

Construction History:

 

The I-68 Sideling Hill Road Cut is 340 feet deep and 200 feet wide from the top of the ridge to the road level, the ridgeline is 1,620 feet high from sea level. 4.5 million cubic yards (10 Million Tonnes) of the - Formation was excavated from Sideling Hill, the removed rock was crushed and then used for the base below. The construction cost $20.1 million for the project, Holloway Construction of Wixon was the main company involved with the road cut.  

The benches cut out in the sides of Sideling Hill are to catch rocks that fall down and could potentially cause an accident, 

SOUTH MOUNTAIN RHYOLITE

The - Formation contains conglomerate, sandstone, siltstone, mudstone, shale, small amounts of coal, and was deposited in the () 325-250 million years ago. 

Marine fossils are visible in the older rocks and plant fossils in the younger part of the formation, this suggests a major environmental change in the deposition environment. The changes in the rocks suggest that the environment was already very versatile and changed often as the layers of different rocks aren't that large in height.

 

REFEreNCES

Maryland Geological Survey, Sideling Hill Exhibit Center, & Maryland Department of Natural Resources. (n.d). FactSheet 17: Construction Information about the Sideling Hill Road Cut & Exhibit Center.

Maryland Geological Survey, Sideling Hill Exhibit Center, & Maryland Department of Natural Resources. (n.d). Geological Information on Sideling Hill Road Cut.